September12014

fyeahbookbinding:

Lego journal (Coptic bounding) - tutorial by Brooklyntonia on Instructables.

follow link for the detailed tutorial

This style could be so cool for little trinkets like broken jewelry, photos, stamps, and other things. Those bits and baubles that might otherwise be lost. 

4PM
allofthestuffandthings:

The Effects of Epilepsy on the Body

Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain that causes recurring seizures. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, almost three million Americans are living with epilepsy. Epilepsy can be triggered by illness or injury, but most of the time, there is no known cause. Because it is a disorder of the central nervous system, effects can be felt throughout the body. Due to the unpredictability of seizures, there can also be a great emotional toll.


Central Nervous System:
The brain is the central hub for all voluntary and involuntary movements in your body. Electrical activity running through nerve cells help your brain tell your body what to do. When abnormal signals interrupt the brain’s normal functioning, you can have a seizure. There are several different types of seizures.

Focal/Partial Seizures:
Focal seizures, also called partial seizures, are when abnormal electrical functions happen on only one side of the brain. Some people feel an aura, or a feeling of euphoria or doom, right before having a seizure. Other pre-seizure symptoms include changes to sight, hearing, or smell perception.

In a simple focal seizure, symptoms depend on which area of the brain is involved. The seizure may be accompanied by nausea or sweating. A complex focal seizure happens in the temporal lobe, which affects memory and emotion. This type of seizure usually involves loss of consciousness or lack of awareness of what’s happening. Symptoms may include screaming, crying, laughing, or lip smacking. There’s usually a feeling of sleepiness following a complex focal seizure.

Generalized Seizures:
When both sides of the brain are involved, it’s called a generalized seizure, which may cause loss of consciousness. Absence seizures, or petit mal seizures, are short, usually lasting half a minute or less. A person having an absence seizure may appear to be staring and will have no awareness of what happened. There may be some facial twitching or rapid blinking. In atonic seizures, or drop attacks, there’s a sudden loss of muscle tone, causing you to fall without warning.

In a generalized tonic-clonic seizure, or grand mal seizure, the body and limbs contract and extend. This is followed by tremor, after which the muscles relax. Other symptoms include fatigue, severe headache, and body aches. Sometimes there are speech and vision disturbances. People who have numerous tonic-clonic seizures are at increased risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Myoclonic seizures involve sudden, jerky muscle movements. This type of seizure usually happens multiple times a day over several days.

Status epilepticus describes a seizure that lasts for an extended time – usually from 5 to 30 minutes. It can also mean you’re having multiple seizures without coming to consciousness in between. Status epilepticus increases the risk of permanent damage to the brain.

According to the Epilepsy Foundation Michigan, about 30 percent of people with epilepsy eventually develop clinical depression. Epileptic seizures can also make you more prone to falls and injuries. There’s a common misconception that you can swallow your tongue when you’re having a seizure, but that’s not possible.


Circulatory and Respiratory Systems:
Epileptic seizures can interfere with your heart rhythm and breathing. Symptoms include shortness of breath and coughing. In rare cases, choking occurs. Over the long term, epilepsy increases risk of heart disease and stroke. Some cases of SUDEP are thought to be due to heart and breathing problems.


Muscular and Digestive Systems:
During a seizure, misfires from the brain can tell your muscles to contract and relax. A seizure may cause muscles to jerk uncontrollably. In some cases, you can lose muscle tone so quickly that you fall down. When muscles surrounding your vocal cords seize up, it pushes out air. It sounds like a cry or a scream.

Epilepsy, and some of the drugs used to treat it, can cause digestive problems like heartburn, nausea, and vomiting. Constipation and diarrhea can also be problematic. In children, epileptic seizures can cause abdominal pain. During a seizure, or immediately following one, you may lose bowel or bladder control.


Reproductive System:
Although epilepsy doesn’t affect the reproductive system directly, it can have an impact on pregnancy. Among women with epilepsy, about 25 to 40 percent experience a higher number of seizures during pregnancy, according to the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Most women with epilepsy have healthy pregnancies and deliver healthy babies. However, there is a higher risk of hypertension, delivering an underweight baby, and stillbirth. Pregnant women with epilepsy should be closely monitored.



Article Sources:
Blum, D., MD. (1999). Total impact of epilepsy: Biological, psychological, social, and economic aspects. Division of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute. Retrieved June 27, 2014, from http://www.thebarrow.org/Education_And_Resources/Barrow_Quarterly/204913

Devinsky, O. (2004). Effects of seizures on autonomic and cardiovascular function. Epilepsy Curr. 4 (2), 43–46. doi: 10.1111/j.1535-7597.2004.42001.x. Retrieved June 27, 2014, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC531654/

Epilepsy and pregnancy. (n.d.). University of Rochester Medical Center. Retrieved June 27, 2014, from http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/Encyclopedia/Content.aspx?ContentTypeID=90&ContentID=P02474


- See more at: http://www.healthline.com/health/epilepsy/effects-on-body#sthash.8ZySsnYY.dpuf

allofthestuffandthings:

The Effects of Epilepsy on the Body

Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain that causes recurring seizures. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, almost three million Americans are living with epilepsy. Epilepsy can be triggered by illness or injury, but most of the time, there is no known cause. Because it is a disorder of the central nervous system, effects can be felt throughout the body. Due to the unpredictability of seizures, there can also be a great emotional toll.


Central Nervous System:
The brain is the central hub for all voluntary and involuntary movements in your body. Electrical activity running through nerve cells help your brain tell your body what to do. When abnormal signals interrupt the brain’s normal functioning, you can have a seizure. There are several different types of seizures.

Focal/Partial Seizures:
Focal seizures, also called partial seizures, are when abnormal electrical functions happen on only one side of the brain. Some people feel an aura, or a feeling of euphoria or doom, right before having a seizure. Other pre-seizure symptoms include changes to sight, hearing, or smell perception.

In a simple focal seizure, symptoms depend on which area of the brain is involved. The seizure may be accompanied by nausea or sweating. A complex focal seizure happens in the temporal lobe, which affects memory and emotion. This type of seizure usually involves loss of consciousness or lack of awareness of what’s happening. Symptoms may include screaming, crying, laughing, or lip smacking. There’s usually a feeling of sleepiness following a complex focal seizure.

Generalized Seizures:
When both sides of the brain are involved, it’s called a generalized seizure, which may cause loss of consciousness. Absence seizures, or petit mal seizures, are short, usually lasting half a minute or less. A person having an absence seizure may appear to be staring and will have no awareness of what happened. There may be some facial twitching or rapid blinking. In atonic seizures, or drop attacks, there’s a sudden loss of muscle tone, causing you to fall without warning.

In a generalized tonic-clonic seizure, or grand mal seizure, the body and limbs contract and extend. This is followed by tremor, after which the muscles relax. Other symptoms include fatigue, severe headache, and body aches. Sometimes there are speech and vision disturbances. People who have numerous tonic-clonic seizures are at increased risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Myoclonic seizures involve sudden, jerky muscle movements. This type of seizure usually happens multiple times a day over several days.

Status epilepticus describes a seizure that lasts for an extended time – usually from 5 to 30 minutes. It can also mean you’re having multiple seizures without coming to consciousness in between. Status epilepticus increases the risk of permanent damage to the brain.

According to the Epilepsy Foundation Michigan, about 30 percent of people with epilepsy eventually develop clinical depression. Epileptic seizures can also make you more prone to falls and injuries. There’s a common misconception that you can swallow your tongue when you’re having a seizure, but that’s not possible.


Circulatory and Respiratory Systems:
Epileptic seizures can interfere with your heart rhythm and breathing. Symptoms include shortness of breath and coughing. In rare cases, choking occurs. Over the long term, epilepsy increases risk of heart disease and stroke. Some cases of SUDEP are thought to be due to heart and breathing problems.


Muscular and Digestive Systems:
During a seizure, misfires from the brain can tell your muscles to contract and relax. A seizure may cause muscles to jerk uncontrollably. In some cases, you can lose muscle tone so quickly that you fall down. When muscles surrounding your vocal cords seize up, it pushes out air. It sounds like a cry or a scream.

Epilepsy, and some of the drugs used to treat it, can cause digestive problems like heartburn, nausea, and vomiting. Constipation and diarrhea can also be problematic. In children, epileptic seizures can cause abdominal pain. During a seizure, or immediately following one, you may lose bowel or bladder control.


Reproductive System:
Although epilepsy doesn’t affect the reproductive system directly, it can have an impact on pregnancy. Among women with epilepsy, about 25 to 40 percent experience a higher number of seizures during pregnancy, according to the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Most women with epilepsy have healthy pregnancies and deliver healthy babies. However, there is a higher risk of hypertension, delivering an underweight baby, and stillbirth. Pregnant women with epilepsy should be closely monitored.

Article Sources:
Blum, D., MD. (1999). Total impact of epilepsy: Biological, psychological, social, and economic aspects. Division of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute. Retrieved June 27, 2014, from http://www.thebarrow.org/Education_And_Resources/Barrow_Quarterly/204913

Devinsky, O. (2004). Effects of seizures on autonomic and cardiovascular function. Epilepsy Curr. 4 (2), 43–46. doi: 10.1111/j.1535-7597.2004.42001.x. Retrieved June 27, 2014, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC531654/

Epilepsy and pregnancy. (n.d.). University of Rochester Medical Center. Retrieved June 27, 2014, from http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/Encyclopedia/Content.aspx?ContentTypeID=90&ContentID=P02474


- See more at: http://www.healthline.com/health/epilepsy/effects-on-body#sthash.8ZySsnYY.dpuf

8AM

bluewindsummer:

*shows up 15 minutes late with a crappy dorito comic*

Origin Stories: CAPTAIN DORITO (this is part 1) (part 2 out next week or something)

Click here for other Avengers comics

(via flewmymind)

8AM
  • French: This chair is feminine! "La Chaise!"
  • Italian: This chair is feminine! "La sedia!"
  • German: This chair is masculine! "Der Stuhl!"
  • English: This chair is a fucking object, I don't see a skirt or a pair of trousers anywhere on its cold hard surface, you people are fucking insane.
  • Japanese: If you don't pronounce chair exactly right, you'll end up saying testicles instead.
August312014

bookriot:

Ready, Set, Hold!

Did you know that your library lets you put a book on hold before the publication date- sometimes MONTHS before? We’re starting a new monthly video series that tells you about the biggest, most in-demand books coming out over the next few months, so you can put them on hold at your library before everyone else does. Here’s installment one

Haven’t watched the video but now the pressure is on to finish reading Sabriel.

(via powells)

August302014
  • after watching a life-ruining anime: what the fuck WHAT THE FUCK. WAS THAT. WHAT TH E FUCK WAS THAT. WHAT THE FUCK JUST HAPPENED. THAT SHITS FUCKED UP. IM FUCKED UP
  • talking to friend on skype: hey theres this really cool anime you gotta watch youre gonna love it
August292014

mittiepaul:

The way some people freak out about pumpkin spice stuff coming back you’d think it’s a rare drug from a desert planet or something…

(via lazulisong)

August282014

upperleadworth:

proudwinchesters:

but aren’t these the same garden??….?

once again it is time to play “is the bbc just cheap or does this mean something”

I recognized the actress in the bottom image but not the significance of the garden. Who is in the top image? It looks a bit like Amy. ETA: Season 8 premier of Doctor Who, like its sibling Sherlock was, is very patronizing to the fandom. The execution is more subtle than the latter but with similar results. (I’m more forgiving here, perhaps, because hidden clues and links are standard fare in Doctor Who.) All this to say, here is a link to an article outlining most those references to previous episodes. (I feel they missed a few.) http://welldidyouevah.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/doctor-who-season-8-episode-1-deep-breath/

(via thedoctorknits)

August272014
jeannepompadour:

Costume from an unknown film..does anyone know what this might be from please? Thanks

So, a google image search leads to a blog post, in French, about a trip to ‘The Calais International Centre of Lace and Fashion’ in Calais, France. (http://tentaculesetprejuges.blogspot.com/2013/06/expo-la-cite-internationale-de-la.html?m=1)   This image is included with pictures of the permanent collection. The dress is not necessarily from a film it may be a theatrical costume but is more likely part of their fashion collection. According to this post (http://www.miadumont.com/mode/dentelles-de-calais-lace-in-slendor/), on Miadumont.com, the collection includes lace fashions from the late 1800s to 1920s and 300 years of lace history. If you want to know more about the dress, which was on display in June 2013, you might call or write directly to the museum.

jeannepompadour:

Costume from an unknown film..does anyone know what this might be from please? Thanks

So, a google image search leads to a blog post, in French, about a trip to ‘The Calais International Centre of Lace and Fashion’ in Calais, France. (http://tentaculesetprejuges.blogspot.com/2013/06/expo-la-cite-internationale-de-la.html?m=1)

This image is included with pictures of the permanent collection. The dress is not necessarily from a film it may be a theatrical costume but is more likely part of their fashion collection. According to this post (http://www.miadumont.com/mode/dentelles-de-calais-lace-in-slendor/), on Miadumont.com, the collection includes lace fashions from the late 1800s to 1920s and 300 years of lace history. If you want to know more about the dress, which was on display in June 2013, you might call or write directly to the museum.

August262014

finding-forests:

Just listed this one ! More to come !
Get it here ! $15 + shipping

Handmade journals available on etsy. If you enjoy beautifully bound journals you should follow finding-forests. I am so tempted to order one.

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